Operations FAQ

  • Q
    A
    The top of a natural gas transmission pipeline generally is at least 30 inches (2.5 feet) below the ground's surface when installed, but that can vary depending on the size of the line, soil type and the terrain.
  • Q
    A
    Some natural gas pipelines are as small as one inch in diameter, while other pipelines are as large as 48 inches in diameter. Generally smaller pipe is used for distribution (which deliver gas to homes and businesses) or gathering pipelines (which move production to processing plants or larger pipelines). INGAA represents the operators of transmission pipelines, larger lines that tend to operate under higher pressure, and that serve as the “highways” of the pipeline network.
  • Q
    A
    A pipeline company must install compressors along the pipeline to re-pressure the natural gas so it may continue to flow to the end user. Compressor stations are typically installed at intervals of 30 to 70 miles (approximately 48 to 112 kilometers) along the pipeline. When natural gas is first transported through transmission lines it can be passed through at varying pressures depending on the individual pipeline and location. By the time it reaches a household piping system at your local gas company, pressure has been reduced to less than the pressure created by a child blowing bubbles into milk through a straw.
  • Q
    A
    A pipeline company must install compressors along the pipeline to re-pressure the natural gas so it may continue to flow. Compressor stations are typically installed at intervals of about 30 to 70 miles (approximately 48 to 112 kms) along the pipeline.