Construction FAQ

For additional information to what you will find below, please visit INGAA’s pipeline construction microsite.

 

  • Q
    A
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) evaluates whether the interstate natural gas pipeline projects proposed by private companies should be approved. The Federal government does not propose, construct, operate or own such projects. FERC has a helpful brochure(http://www.ferc.gov/resources/resources.asp) to explain the approval process and answer your questions. To learn more about living and working near a pipeline, please access the INGAA Public Safety Brochure here.(http://www.ingaa.org/File.aspx?id=12282)
  • Q
    A
    After construction, the temporary right of way is restored to make sure that the foliage and grassland is returned as closely as possible to its original condition. Agricultural lands will be properly restored using approved mitigation techniques designed to ensure full productive reuse of the agricultural lands. Land representatives will meet with all directly affected landowners to assess any particular issues or concerns that the landowner may have, such as impact to landscaping or structures such as fences, sheds or playground equipment.
  • Q
    A
    Pipelines are constructed using different material depending on their size, pressure requirements and use. Transmission and gathering pipes, the pipes used to transport gas from supply areas to distribution centers, are made of 0.25-inch to 0.5-inch thick steel and have a special coating to protect against corrosion. For distribution pipelines, used by your local gas company to deliver to your home, plastic often is used because it is resistant to corrosion, flexible, and cost-effective especially lines which operate at less than 100 pounds of pressure.