Safety FAQ

  • Q
    A
    Yes. Pipelines are the safest, most reliable and efficient manner of transporting energy products. The Department of Transportation, or DOT, oversees interstate natural gas pipelines, and they often note that pipelines are the safest form of energy transportation. Statistics gathered by the National Transportation Safety Board (http://www.ntsb.gov/), a federal agency, indicate that pipelines make up less than one one-hundredth of one percent (.01%) of all transportation accidents in the United States. There are approximately 300,000 miles of natural gas transmission pipelines throughout the United States that deliver safe, reliable natural gas to American families and businesses. Pipelines exist almost everywhere throughout the United States -generally buried underground – transporting the energy that you depend on every day to heat your home, generate electricity, cook your food and so much more. Pipelines are a vital and efficient part of the United States’ energy infrastructure.
  • Q
    A
    Pigs are used to inspect pipelines. No, not the farm animals, but robotic devices called pigs because of the squealing sound they make when they travel through the pipelines. “Smart” pigs are used to evaluate the inside of the pipeline and ensure that they are safe. Pigs can ensure proper pipe structure, detect signs of corrosion or leaks and also can be used to clean the lines. Smart pigs are just one of the many ways that the pipeline industry ensures safety (http://ingaa.org/3515.aspx). Pipeline operators also conduct routine aerial and walking inspections of the pipeline and they monitor the pipeline’s pressure 24/7.
  • Q
    A
    Pipeline leaks are rare, but being able to recognize and respond to a suspected leak or rupture is an important part of living and working safely around underground pipelines. Signs of a natural gas pipeline RUPTURE: · Loud roaring or explosive sound; OR · Very large flames and loud roaring noise. Signs of a natural gas pipeline LEAK: · Rotten egg odor · Dead vegetation over or near the pipeline
  • Q
    A
    The Department of Transportation (DOT) has a tool on its website called The "National Pipeline Mapping System" (http://www.npms.phmsa.dot.gov/PublicViewer/) that you may use by providing a zip code. If you plan to do any digging on your property or in general, please call 811 before starting your project. You can find more information online at http://www.call811.com/